William Goodes Journal – Our politicians and security services achieve the impossible.

This was another comment of mine in relation to this article in the Guardian UK.
The article relates to how easily we all give our private information away without a thought for what happens to it in the future. There is a horizon and we are heading towards it, the reckoning day when our privacy will be used possibly against us, unlike now where we don’t feel, notice or care, I have a feeling we will one day. At bottom an individuals private information can become of use politically, is it a matter of time?
You may feel George Orwells 1984 has come and gone and it wasn’t too bad, has it come yet?

This is my comment in the Guardian UK.

“Our current crop of politicians/security services whoever, deserve the 10,200 pounds themselves right now. They have managed to accomplish what one would think is the impossible and that is too:
1. Get a whole pile of citizens to vote for policies that are not in their own interest whatsoever and:
2. Hand over all their private, confidential (you might say classified) information willy nilly to governments and business without a care in the world.

Now that is an outstanding achievment.”

William Goode’s Journal – Brendan Chilcutts Museum of Endangered Sounds

I was put onto this site by a friend of mine. It is seriously worth a look and at the same time a lot of fun and may just bring a few memories back. Brendan Chilcutt is collecting sounds that are now almost extinct. Have a listen, you will remember most of them. Nice graphics too, this is a site I’ll be visiting regularily. Oh and i love the fact that you can play them all at the same time should you wish, seriously interesting.

This is text from Brendan Chilcutts site:

The Museum Of Endangered Sounds is owned and operated by me, Brendan Chilcutt (handle: kidpeleus99@aol.com).

I launched the site in January of 2012 as a way to preserve the sounds made famous by my favorite old technologies and electronics equipment. For instance, the textured rattle and hum of a VHS tape being sucked into the womb of a 1983 JVC HR-7100 VCR. As you probably know, it’s a wonderfully complex sound, subtle yet unfiltered. But, as streaming playback becomes more common in the US, and as people in developing nations like Canada and the UK get brought up to DVD players, it’s likely that the world will have seen and heard the last of older machines like the HR-7100. And as new products come to market, we stand to lose much more than VCRs.

Imagine a world where we never again hear the symphonic startup of a Windows 95 machine. Imagine generations of children unacquainted with the chattering of angels lodged deep within the recesses of an old cathode ray tube TV. And when the entire world has adopted devices with sleek, silent touch interfaces, where will we turn for the sound of fingers striking QWERTY keypads? Tell me that. And tell me: Who will play my GameBoy when I’m gone?

These questions and more led me to the undertaking that is The Museum Of Endangered Sounds.

My ten-year plan is to complete the data collection phase by the year 2015, and spend the next seven years developing the proper markup language to reinterpret the sounds as a binary composition.

If you don’t understand my passion and the significance of my work, you probably never will. But if you do, then you’ve come to the right place.

And please, please email me if you enjoy the museum or have any questions! I love to hear from people and need to know what gadget sounds I am missing.

Thank you!